England’s Lake District

As a 19 year old foreign exchange student in Scotland, I made my first visit to the Lake District of England over a long weekend and immediately fell in love with the terrain and local culture. Through many other visits over the years, I took a few daylong treks and always looked with envy at the people carrying their rucksacks on more serious adventures up into the fells. “Some day…” I hoped, “I want to do that, too!”

Lakeland is England’s largest and most popular National Park, but it still amazes me how frequent London visitors never get up there (or if they do, it’s only for a quick visit to over-populated Lake Windermere). I hope that by sharing some of my experiences, photos, and videos this month, more of you will be inspired to get out on your local trails, and set your sights on a goal worthy of your efforts.

By way of introduction to “the Lakes,” and in particular, the fells high above the lakes, here are a couple of links that explain what I’ll be doing.

A Wainright did more than any other individual to introduce the rest of us to the joys of what is termed “fell-walking,” (read: hiking up on mountains). In the 1950s and 60s, he wrote a marvelous set of hand-written and hand-drawn pictorial guidebooks describing 214 peaks and many popular trails.

A Wainright, The Southern Fells. Credit: Wikipedia

Building upon Wainright’s work, Emily Woodhouse has more recently penned a great article: 5 of the Best Hikes in the Lake District. It presents some nice photos, descriptions, and stats on some of the hikes on my itinerary. With some luck and free time, I hope to add my own coverage of these and many other routes.

View from the top of Helvellyn in the English Lake District. Credit: iStock nailzchap

 

Author: Chris

Until recently, I served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Namibia focused on Community Economic Development. Before that, I was a high-tech executive, small business owner, consultant and business broker.

2 thoughts on “England’s Lake District”

  1. I love the Lake District- I have a good friend who lives on the north side and finds that life is too quiet after a lifetime of soldiering – so he joined the Penrith Mountain Search and Rescue – he is still very fit and they get called out at all hours and in all weathers (of course!)
    I have done day hikes with him – the locals call it “Fell Bashing” it’s hard work but the exercise and the views – so rewarding – then there is a pint or two afterwards at the local pub of course

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